Registered Building Surveyor’s Inspection Plan (post 1 of 2)

by Bregs Blog admin team

istock-photo-construction

The Blog was recently contacted by a Registered Building Surveyor. His letter addressed Minister Phil Hogan’s stated costs for BC(A)R SI.9 at between €1000 and €3000. We table the letter received and also the pdf inspection plan kindly prepared for review by blog readers which is attached also. This is part 1 of a two part post. The second post will deal with a Draft Inspection Form.

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Post 1: A Registered Building Surveyor’s Inspection Plan

Dear BReg Blog,

Please find attached my Preliminary Site Inspection List. I prepared this overall list to help evaluate the number of site inspections that would be required. This list is not exhaustive.  Some may think it is too in depth, others may think it is not enough. Anyone wishing to comment or add to this list please do so.

It would be of great benefit to everyone and maybe a global template can be established.

This will be broken down into separate Inspection sheets for each of the stages, (33 inspection sheets minmal per project),where critical information, client name, address, date of inspection, completed Elements of construction can be signed off, even jointly by certifier and contractor.

All this will be backed up by photographs and sketches.  It can then be all collated and sent to the Building Control Authority with the final completion certificate.

The list is prepared on the basis of carrying out inspections at the various critical stages, throughout a project, from start to finish.

It is important to note that no matter how small or big the project is (an extension greater than 40 sq.m. or a new house), the list shows the minimum inspections. An architect’s designed one-off house would have more specific detailing and as such would require additional inspections and more attention to detail

From looking at the attached list of 33 inspections, each stage could take upto three hours, (99 hours)

Taking into consideration travel time, the inspection, meeting with the builder, returning to the office collating information, downloading photos and contacting and reporting to the client.

On comparing this list from a time perspective, it was interesting to see that it is comparable to the RIAI’s quantative time of 160 hours and the recent posting which appeared in The Engineers Journal on 24th April 2014: “Building Control Regulations: how it works in practice”, where 13 days work has been established for the on-site works(7 hour day = 91 hours). See post here.

Another posting quantified an hourly rate of €6.25, based on the ministers thinking of what an Assigned. See post here.

Designer/Certifier should charge.  Who would engage in such work and take on the responsibility required Under BC(A)R SI9. We are professionals, who have studied and learned through experience aiming to make a living and take on responsibility.

The Minister should read this list and have a re-think!!!

I hope that anyone reading the list will find it of benefit and to reiterate if anyone wants To add or detract any item, please feel free to do so, it will be for the common good.

Regards,

Registered Building Surveyor

Attached PDF Inspection Plan: Preliminary Site Inspection Framework

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Other posts of interest on the topic of certifiers, certification, inspections and fees:

Specialist Certifier 1- Engineer: Questions and Answers – click here

Certifiers call for help! – click here

Practical Post 9: Fees & numbers of inspections? BC(A)R SI.9 – click link here

Practical Post 8: Employees won’t certify? BC(A)R SI.9- click link here

O’Cofaigh: Competitiveness issues & BC(A)R SI.9- click link here

The Engineers Journal: how BC(A)R SI.9 works in practice | BRegs Blog- click link here

Complaint to Minister: Fee fixing & BC(A)R SI.9 – click link here

 

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