UK and Ireland: Take a quick drive to Newry with BReg Blog…

by Bregs Blog admin team

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By BRegs Blog on October 20th 2014

It was commented in an earlier post about independent inspections  (see posts below) that:

one need only take the train to Newry or the boat to Holyhead. Such system can and does work, deliver better building, and can cost the State a net nothing

So to save you the drive along the new road, we took a look at the Building Control Service provided in Newry & Mourne District Council*, a short distance from Louth County Council where “responsibility for compliance with the Building Regulations lies with you, your designer and construction teams” (Link louthcoco.ie )

In Newry, the role of Building Control includes “assessing your plans and inspecting your house at various stages as it is being built” (Link newryandmourne.gov.uk )

This is an extract from the section about building your new house in Newry:

Inspections

Surveyors from Building Control will arrange to inspect your new house at various stages as it is being built.

Whilst it is ultimately your responsibility to notify us, in advance, of any inspection you can arrange for your builder to do this for you.

The building Regulations require you to give us 2 days notice prior to any inspection, but if we receive a request before 10.30 am we will do our best to carry out an inspection that day.

It is also important to note that 5 days notice is required prior to you occupying or completing your house. Please therefore ensure that we are given the appropriate notice at the following [eight] stages:

  1. Commencement
  2. Excavation of foundations
  3. Substructure / hardcore
  4. Damp proof courses
  5. First fix
  6. Drainage
  7. Pre-occupation
  8. Completion

If we do not receive notice and you or your builder cover up work before we have inspected it, you will be asked to expose all or part of that work to allow us to determine whether it complies with the Building Regulations.

Completion Certificate

When your house has been built and we are satisfied, in as far as we can reasonably tell, that the requirements of the Building Regulations have been met, we will issue you with a “Completion Certificate”.

This is an important document and you should file this away for safe keeping. If you ever sell or re-mortgage your house your solicitor, bank or building society may request a copy of the Completion Certificate for the house. It may also be required for the purposes of reclaiming VAT.

Fees

There are two occasions when you pay us fees.

  1. When your plans are sent to us for approval.
  2. When we carry out the inspections.

The fees for the inspections is payable in one lump sum and we will send you an invoice for this, once we have completed our first inspection.

For your convenience you can pay by cash, postal order, cheque, debit card, or credit card”

That sounds like a great service- it must be expensive? Same day call out, eight independent inspections, approval of plans and a Completion Certificate!

There’s a handy fees calculator at http://buildingcontrolfees.tascomi.com/

The fee for one-off house (under 250 sq. m.) for the full Building Control service is:

  • Plans £90
  • Site Inspections £210

That is a total of £300.00 (approx. €370.00) and this service is largely self-funding.

In Ireland the fee to Building Control for a one-off house is only €30 – a fee that hasn’t increased since 1997.

The cost of a system of independent building control for Ireland will be expanded in future posts.

In the The World Bank “Doing Business” Report 2014 Ireland ranks 115th out of 189 countries in “Dealing with construction permits”. The UK ranks 27th. The World Bank Report is due out at the end of the month- it should make for interesting reading.

And better still………………. they have no pyrite in Newry.

*Bregs Blog have a very limited travel budget.

Other posts of interest:

How much would 100% independent inspections by Local Authorities cost? 

€ 5 billion | The extraordinary cost of S.I.9 self-certification by 2020

Pyrite: the spiraling cost of no Local Authority Inspections

SI.9 costs for a typical house

O’Cofaigh letter to senators BC(A)R SI.9

World Bank Rankings, Ireland & SI.9 – Look Back 1

The cost of a Solution to BC(A)R SI.9? 

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